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Title: Deconvolving Pulsar Signals with Cyclic Spectroscopy: A Systematic Evaluation
Abstract Radio pulsar signals are significantly perturbed by their propagation through the ionized interstellar medium. In addition to the frequency-dependent pulse times of arrival due to dispersion, pulse shapes are also distorted and shifted, having been scattered by the inhomogeneous interstellar plasma, affecting pulse arrival times. Understanding the degree to which scattering affects pulsar timing is important for gravitational-wave detection with pulsar timing arrays (PTAs), which depend on the reliability of pulsars as stable clocks with an uncertainty of ∼100 ns or less over ∼10 yr or more. Scattering can be described as a convolution of the intrinsic pulse shape with an impulse response function representing the effects of multipath propagation. In previous studies, the technique of cyclic spectroscopy has been applied to pulsar signals to deconvolve the effects of scattering from the original emitted signals, increasing the overall timing precision. We present an analysis of simulated data to test the quality of deconvolution using cyclic spectroscopy over a range of parameters characterizing interstellar scattering and pulsar signal-to-noise ratio (S/N). We show that cyclic spectroscopy is most effective for high S/N and/or highly scattered pulsars. We conclude that cyclic spectroscopy could play an important role in scattering correction to distant more » populations of highly scattered pulsars not currently included in PTAs. For future telescopes and for current instruments such as the Green Bank Telescope upgraded with the ultrawide bandwidth receiver, cyclic spectroscopy could potentially double the number of PTA-quality pulsars. « less
Authors:
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Award ID(s):
2020265 2009759
Publication Date:
NSF-PAR ID:
10321824
Journal Name:
The Astrophysical Journal
Volume:
913
Issue:
2
ISSN:
0004-637X
Sponsoring Org:
National Science Foundation
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