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This content will become publicly available on January 1, 2023

Title: On Explicit Constructions of Extremely Depth Robust Graphs
A directed acyclic graph G = (V,E) is said to be (e,d)-depth robust if for every subset S ⊆ V of |S| ≤ e nodes the graph G-S still contains a directed path of length d. If the graph is (e,d)-depth-robust for any e,d such that e+d ≤ (1-ε)|V| then the graph is said to be ε-extreme depth-robust. In the field of cryptography, (extremely) depth-robust graphs with low indegree have found numerous applications including the design of side-channel resistant Memory-Hard Functions, Proofs of Space and Replication and in the design of Computationally Relaxed Locally Correctable Codes. In these applications, it is desirable to ensure the graphs are locally navigable, i.e., there is an efficient algorithm GetParents running in time polylog|V| which takes as input a node v ∈ V and returns the set of v’s parents. We give the first explicit construction of locally navigable ε-extreme depth-robust graphs with indegree O(log |V|). Previous constructions of ε-extreme depth-robust graphs either had indegree ω̃(log² |V|) or were not explicit.
Authors:
; ; ;
Editors:
Berenbrink, Petra and
Award ID(s):
2047272 1931443 1910659
Publication Date:
NSF-PAR ID:
10322470
Journal Name:
Leibniz international proceedings in informatics
Volume:
219
ISSN:
1868-8969
Sponsoring Org:
National Science Foundation
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