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Title: Antiferromagnetic excitonic insulator state in Sr3Ir2O7
Abstract Excitonic insulators are usually considered to form via the condensation of a soft charge mode of bound electron-hole pairs. This, however, presumes that the soft exciton is of spin-singlet character. Early theoretical considerations have also predicted a very distinct scenario, in which the condensation of magnetic excitons results in an antiferromagnetic excitonic insulator state. Here we report resonant inelastic x-ray scattering (RIXS) measurements of Sr 3 Ir 2 O 7 . By isolating the longitudinal component of the spectra, we identify a magnetic mode that is well-defined at the magnetic and structural Brillouin zone centers, but which merges with the electronic continuum in between these high symmetry points and which decays upon heating concurrent with a decrease in the material’s resistivity. We show that a bilayer Hubbard model, in which electron-hole pairs are bound by exchange interactions, consistently explains all the electronic and magnetic properties of Sr 3 Ir 2 O 7 indicating that this material is a realization of the long-predicted antiferromagnetic excitonic insulator phase.
Authors:
; ; ; ; ; ; ; ; ; ; ; ; ; ; ;
Award ID(s):
1848269
Publication Date:
NSF-PAR ID:
10322855
Journal Name:
Nature Communications
Volume:
13
Issue:
1
ISSN:
2041-1723
Sponsoring Org:
National Science Foundation
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