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This content will become publicly available on January 7, 2023

Title: Increasing co-occurrence of fine particulate matter and ground-level ozone extremes in the western United States
Wildfires and meteorological conditions influence the co-occurrence of multiple harmful air pollutants including fine particulate matter (PM 2.5 ) and ground-level ozone. We examine the spatiotemporal characteristics of PM 2.5 /ozone co-occurrences and associated population exposure in the western United States (US). The frequency, spatial extent, and temporal persistence of extreme PM 2.5 /ozone co-occurrences have increased significantly between 2001 and 2020, increasing annual population exposure to multiple harmful air pollutants by ~25 million person-days/year. Using a clustering methodology to characterize daily weather patterns, we identify significant increases in atmospheric ridging patterns conducive to widespread PM 2.5 /ozone co-occurrences and population exposure. We further link the spatial extent of co-occurrence to the extent of extreme heat and wildfires. Our results suggest an increasing potential for co-occurring air pollution episodes in the western US with continued climate change.
Authors:
; ; ; ;
Award ID(s):
1934383
Publication Date:
NSF-PAR ID:
10323393
Journal Name:
Science Advances
Volume:
8
Issue:
1
ISSN:
2375-2548
Sponsoring Org:
National Science Foundation
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