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This content will become publicly available on December 1, 2023

Title: To isolate or not to isolate: the impact of changing behavior on COVID-19 transmission
Abstract Background The COVID-19 pandemic has caused more than 25 million cases and 800 thousand deaths worldwide to date. In early days of the pandemic, neither vaccines nor therapeutic drugs were available for this novel coronavirus. All measures to prevent the spread of COVID-19 are thus based on reducing contact between infected and susceptible individuals. Most of these measures such as quarantine and self-isolation require voluntary compliance by the population. However, humans may act in their (perceived) self-interest only. Methods We construct a mathematical model of COVID-19 transmission with quarantine and hospitalization coupled with a dynamic game model of adaptive human behavior. Susceptible and infected individuals adopt various behavioral strategies based on perceived prevalence and burden of the disease and sensitivity to isolation measures, and they evolve their strategies using a social learning algorithm (imitation dynamics). Results This results in complex interplay between the epidemiological model, which affects success of different strategies, and the game-theoretic behavioral model, which in turn affects the spread of the disease. We found that the second wave of the pandemic, which has been observed in the US, can be attributed to rational behavior of susceptible individuals, and that multiple waves of the pandemic are possible more » if the rate of social learning of infected individuals is sufficiently high. Conclusions To reduce the burden of the disease on the society, it is necessary to incentivize such altruistic behavior by infected individuals as voluntary self-isolation. « less
Authors:
; ; ; ; ; ; ; ; ;
Award ID(s):
2028297
Publication Date:
NSF-PAR ID:
10324037
Journal Name:
BMC Public Health
Volume:
22
Issue:
1
ISSN:
1471-2458
Sponsoring Org:
National Science Foundation
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