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Title: Interferometric Detections of sdO Companions Orbiting Three Classical Be Stars
Abstract Classical Be stars are possible products of close binary evolution, in which the mass donor becomes a hot, stripped O- or B-type subdwarf (sdO/sdB), and the mass gainer spins up and grows a disk to become a Be star. While several Be+sdO binaries have been identified, dynamical masses and other fundamental parameters are available only for a single Be+sdO system, limiting the confrontation with binary evolution models. In this work, we present direct interferometric detections of the sdO companions of three Be stars—28 Cyg, V2119 Cyg, and 60 Cyg—all of which were previously found in UV spectra. For two of the three Be+sdO systems, we present first orbits and preliminary dynamical masses of the components, revealing that one of them could be the first identified progenitor of a Be/X-ray binary with a neutron star companion. These results provide new sets of fundamental parameters that are crucially needed to establish the evolutionary status and origin of Be stars.
Authors:
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Award ID(s):
2034336 1636624 2009489 1908026
Publication Date:
NSF-PAR ID:
10325391
Journal Name:
The Astrophysical Journal
Volume:
926
Issue:
2
Page Range or eLocation-ID:
213
ISSN:
0004-637X
Sponsoring Org:
National Science Foundation
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