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This content will become publicly available on December 14, 2022

Title: High-throughput computation of novel ternary B–C–N structures and carbon allotropes with electronic-level insights into superhard materials from machine learning
Discovering new materials with desired properties has been a dominant and crucial topic of interest in the field of materials science in the past few decades. In this work, novel carbon allotropes and ternary B–C–N structures were generated using the state-of-the-art RG 2 code. All structures were fully optimized using density functional theory with first-principles calculations. Several hundred carbon allotropes and ternary B–C–N structures were identified to be superhard materials. The thermodynamic stability of some randomly selected superhard materials was confirmed by evaluating the full phonon dispersions in the Brillouin zone. The new carbon allotropes and ternary B–C–N structures possess a wide range of mechanical properties generally and Vickers hardness specifically. Through 2D Pearson's correlation map, we first reproduced the well-accepted explanation and relationship of the Vickers hardness of the generated structures with other mechanical properties such as shear modulus, bulk modulus, Pugh's ratio, universal anisotropy, and Poisson's ratio. We then propose two fundamentally new descriptors from the electronic level, namely local potential and electron localization function averaged over a unit cell, both of which exhibit a strong correlation with Vickers hardness. More importantly, these descriptors are easy to access from first-principles calculations (at least two orders of magnitude faster more » than the traditional calculation of elastic constants), and thus can serve as a fast and accurate approach for screening superhard materials. We also combined these new descriptors with known composition and structural descriptors in the machine learning training process. The new descriptors significantly enhance the performance of the trained machine learning model in predicting the Vickers hardness of unknown materials, which provides strong evidence for local potential and electron localization function to be considered in future high-throughput computation. This work unravels more fundamental but previously unexplored knowledge about superhard materials and the newly proposed electronic level descriptors are expected to accelerate the discovery of new superhard materials. « less
Authors:
; ;
Award ID(s):
1655740 2110033
Publication Date:
NSF-PAR ID:
10326200
Journal Name:
Journal of Materials Chemistry A
Volume:
9
Issue:
48
Page Range or eLocation-ID:
27596 to 27614
ISSN:
2050-7488
Sponsoring Org:
National Science Foundation
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Fig. 3(b) shows the tunneling probability T according to the Kane two-band model in the three materials, In0.53Ga0.47As, GaAs, and GaN, following our observation of a similar electroluminescence mechanism in GaN/AlN RTDs (due to strong polarization field of wurtzite structures) [8]. The expression is Tinter = (2/9)∙exp[(-2 ∙Ug 2 ∙me)/(2h∙P∙E)], where Ug is the bandgap energy, P is the valence-to-conduction-band momentum matrix element, and E is the electric field. Values for the highest calculated internal E fields for the InGaAs and GaN are also shown, indicating that Tinter in those structures approaches values of ~10-5. As shown, a GaAs RTD would require an internal field of ~6×105 V/cm, which is rarely realized in standard GaAs RTDs, perhaps explaining why there have been few if any reports of room-temperature electroluminescence in the GaAs devices. [1] E.R. Brown,et al., Appl. Phys. Lett., vol. 58, 2291, 1991. [5] S. 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