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Title: MeerKAT uncovers the physics of an odd radio circle
ABSTRACT Odd radio circles (ORCs) are recently-discovered faint diffuse circles of radio emission, of unknown cause, surrounding galaxies at moderate redshift (z ∼ 0.2 – 0.6). Here, we present detailed new MeerKAT radio images at 1284 MHz of the first ORC, originally discovered with the Australian Square Kilometre Array Pathfinder, with higher resolution (6 arcsec) and sensitivity (∼ 2.4 μJy/beam). In addition to the new images, which reveal a complex internal structure consisting of multiple arcs, we also present polarization and spectral index maps. Based on these new data, we consider potential mechanisms that may generate the ORCs.
Authors:
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Award ID(s):
1714205
Publication Date:
NSF-PAR ID:
10326552
Journal Name:
Monthly Notices of the Royal Astronomical Society
Volume:
513
Issue:
1
Page Range or eLocation-ID:
1300 to 1316
ISSN:
0035-8711
Sponsoring Org:
National Science Foundation
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