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Title: Longitudinal and Lateral Shear Flow in a Dusty Plasma
In this research, we present a study on the manner in which induced longitudinal (axial) and lateral (radial) shear flows differ experimentally when stimulated in a three-dimensional (3D) complex (dusty) plasma produced in the PlasmaKristal-4 (PK4- BU) at Baylor University.  more » « less
Award ID(s):
1740203
NSF-PAR ID:
10326711
Author(s) / Creator(s):
; ; ; ;
Editor(s):
USRA
Date Published:
Journal Name:
53rd Lunar and Planetary Science Conference (2022)
Format(s):
Medium: X
Sponsoring Org:
National Science Foundation
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