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Title: The energy spectrum of cosmic rays beyond the turn-down around $$\varvec{10^{17}}$$ eV as measured with the surface detector of the Pierre Auger Observatory
Abstract We present a measurement of the cosmic-ray spectrum above 100 PeV using the part of the surface detector of the Pierre Auger Observatory that has a spacing of 750 m. An inflection of the spectrum is observed, confirming the presence of the so-called second-knee feature. The spectrum is then combined with that of the 1500 m array to produce a single measurement of the flux, linking this spectral feature with the three additional breaks at the highest energies. The combined spectrum, with an energy scale set calorimetrically via fluorescence telescopes and using a single detector type, results in the most statistically and systematically precise measurement of spectral breaks yet obtained. These measurements are critical for furthering our understanding of the highest energy cosmic rays.
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Award ID(s):
2111359 2110925 2013146
Publication Date:
NSF-PAR ID:
10330730
Journal Name:
The European Physical Journal C
Volume:
81
Issue:
11
ISSN:
1434-6044
Sponsoring Org:
National Science Foundation
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