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Title: Data from: Land-based climate solutions for the United States
Abstract
Meeting end-of-century global warming targets requires aggressive action on multiple fronts. Recent reports note the futility of addressing mitigation goals without fully engaging the agricultural sector, yet no availableMore>>
Creator(s):
; ; ;
Publisher:
Dryad
Publication Year:
NSF-PAR ID:
10331585
Subject(s):
Nature Based Solutions Bioenergy Cellulosic bioenerg soil carbon croplands grazing land forest land Forest management Agriculture practices climate change mitigation carbon cycle modeling negative CO2 emissions reforestation carbon dioxide nitrous oxide (N2O) carbon capture and sequestration BECCS CCS electric vehicles FOS: Agricultural sciences
Size(s):
129435298 bytes
Version:
2
Award ID(s):
1832042
Sponsoring Org:
National Science Foundation
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