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This content will become publicly available on June 7, 2023

Title: Flow Chemistry: A Sustainable Voyage Through the Chemical Universe en Route to Smart Manufacturing
Microfluidic devices and systems have entered many areas of chemical engineering, and the rate of their adoption is only increasing. As we approach and adapt to the critical global challenges we face in the near future, it is important to consider the capabilities of flow chemistry and its applications in next-generation technologies for sustainability, energy production, and tailor-made specialty chemicals. We present the introduction of microfluidics into the fundamental unit operations of chemical engineering. We discuss the traits and advantages of microfluidic approaches to different reactive systems, both well-established and emerging, with a focus on the integration of modular microfluidic devices into high-efficiency experimental platforms for accelerated process optimization and intensified continuous manufacturing. Finally, we discuss the current state and new horizons in self-driven experimentation in flow chemistry for both intelligent exploration through the chemical universe and distributed manufacturing. Expected final online publication date for the Annual Review of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering, Volume 13 is October 2022. Please see http://www.annualreviews.org/page/journal/pubdates for revised estimates.
Authors:
; ; ; ;
Award ID(s):
1940959 1902702
Publication Date:
NSF-PAR ID:
10333391
Journal Name:
Annual Review of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering
Volume:
13
Issue:
1
ISSN:
1947-5438
Sponsoring Org:
National Science Foundation
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