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Title: Continuous biphasic chemical processes in a four-phase segmented flow reactor
A quaternary segmented flow regime for robust and flexible continuous biphasic chemical processes is introduced and characterized for stability and dynamic properties through over 1500 automatically conducted experiments. The flow format is then used for the continuous flow ligand exchange of cadmium selenide quantum dots under high intensity ultraviolet illumination for improved photoluminescence quantum yield.
Authors:
; ; ; ;
Award ID(s):
1902702
Publication Date:
NSF-PAR ID:
10334596
Journal Name:
Reaction Chemistry & Engineering
Volume:
6
Issue:
8
Page Range or eLocation-ID:
1367 to 1375
ISSN:
2058-9883
Sponsoring Org:
National Science Foundation
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