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This content will become publicly available on December 1, 2023

Title: A localized view on molecular dissociation via electron-ion partial covariance
Abstract Inner-shell photoelectron spectroscopy provides an element-specific probe of molecular structure, as core-electron binding energies are sensitive to the chemical environment. Short-wavelength femtosecond light sources, such as Free-Electron Lasers (FELs), even enable time-resolved site-specific investigations of molecular photochemistry. Here, we study the ultraviolet photodissociation of the prototypical chiral molecule 1-iodo-2-methylbutane, probed by extreme-ultraviolet (XUV) pulses from the Free-electron LASer in Hamburg (FLASH) through the ultrafast evolution of the iodine 4d binding energy. Methodologically, we employ electron-ion partial covariance imaging as a technique to isolate otherwise elusive features in a two-dimensional photoelectron spectrum arising from different photofragmentation pathways. The experimental and theoretical results for the time-resolved electron spectra of the 4d 3/2 and 4d 5/2 atomic and molecular levels that are disentangled by this method provide a key step towards studying structural and chemical changes from a specific spectator site.
Authors:
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Award ID(s):
1753324
Publication Date:
NSF-PAR ID:
10335541
Journal Name:
Communications Chemistry
Volume:
5
Issue:
1
ISSN:
2399-3669
Sponsoring Org:
National Science Foundation
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