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Title: The Phase-I trigger readout electronics upgrade of the ATLAS Liquid Argon calorimeters
Abstract The Phase-I trigger readout electronics upgrade of the ATLAS Liquid Argon calorimeters enhances thephysics reach of the experiment during the upcoming operation atincreasing Large Hadron Collider luminosities.The new system, installed during the second Large Hadron Collider Long Shutdown,increases the trigger readout granularity by up to a factor of tenas well as its precision and range.Consequently, the background rejection at trigger level is improvedthrough enhanced filtering algorithms utilizing the additional informationfor topological discrimination of electromagnetic and hadronic shower shapes.This paper presents the final designs of the new electronic elements,their custom electronic devices, the proceduresused to validate their proper functioning, and the performance achievedduring the commissioning of this system.
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Award ID(s):
2013070
Publication Date:
NSF-PAR ID:
10335598
Journal Name:
Journal of Instrumentation
Volume:
17
Issue:
05
Page Range or eLocation-ID:
P05024
ISSN:
1748-0221
Sponsoring Org:
National Science Foundation
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