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Title: ACM KDD AI4Cyber: The 1st Workshop on Artificial Intelligence-enabled Cybersecurity Analytics
Despite significant contributions to various aspects of cybersecurity, cyber-attacks remain on the unfortunate rise. Increasingly, internationally recognized entities such as the National Science Foundation and National Science & Technology Council have noted Artificial Intelligence can help analyze billions of log files, Dark Web data, malware, and other data sources to help execute fundamental cybersecurity tasks. Our objective for the 1st Workshop on Artificial Intelligence-enabled Cybersecurity Analytics (half-day; co-located with ACM KDD) was to gather academic and practitioners to contribute recent work pertaining to AI-enabled cybersecurity analytics. We composed an outstanding, inter-disciplinary Program Committee with significant expertise in various aspects of AI-enabled Cybersecurity Analytics to evaluate the submitted work. Significant contributions to the half-day workshop were made in the areas of CTI, vulnerability assessment, and malware analysis.
Authors:
; ;
Award ID(s):
1917117 2038483
Publication Date:
NSF-PAR ID:
10336812
Journal Name:
ACM SIGKDD Conference on Knowledge Discovery and Data Mining, 2021
Sponsoring Org:
National Science Foundation
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