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Title: The CGM 2 Survey: Circumgalactic O vi from Dwarf to Massive Star-forming Galaxies
Abstract We combine 126 new galaxy-O vi absorber pairs from the CGM 2 survey with 123 pairs drawn from the literature to examine the simultaneous dependence of the column density of O vi absorbers ( N O VI ) on galaxy stellar mass, star-formation rate, and impact parameter. The combined sample consists of 249 galaxy-O vi absorber pairs covering z = 0–0.6, with host galaxy stellar masses M * = 10 7.8 –10 11.2 M ⊙ and galaxy-absorber impact parameters R ⊥ = 0–400 proper kiloparsecs. In this work, we focus on the variation of N O VI with galaxy mass and impact parameter among the star-forming galaxies in the sample. We find that the average N O VI within one virial radius of a star-forming galaxy is greatest for star-forming galaxies with M * = 10 9.2 –10 10 M ⊙ . Star-forming galaxies with M * between 10 8 and 10 11.2 M ⊙ can explain most O vi systems with column densities greater than 10 13.5 cm −2 . Sixty percent of the O vi mass associated with a star-forming galaxy is found within one virial radius, and 35% is found between one and two virial radii. more » In general, we find that some departure from hydrostatic equilibrium in the CGM is necessary to reproduce the observed O vi amount, galaxy mass dependence, and extent. Our measurements serve as a test set for CGM models over a broad range of host galaxy masses. « less
Authors:
; ; ; ; ; ; ; ; ; ; ;
Award ID(s):
1812531
Publication Date:
NSF-PAR ID:
10337345
Journal Name:
The Astrophysical Journal
Volume:
927
Issue:
2
Page Range or eLocation-ID:
147
ISSN:
0004-637X
Sponsoring Org:
National Science Foundation
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