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This content will become publicly available on May 1, 2023

Title: Communication Trade Offs in Intermediate Qudit Circuits
Quantum computing promises speedup of classical algorithms in the long term. Current hardware is unable to support this goal and programs must be efficiently compiled to use of the devices through reduction of qubits used, gate count and circuit duration. Many quantum systems have access to higher levels, expanding the computational space for a device. We develop higher level qudit communication circuits, compilation pipelines, and circuits that take advantage of this extra space by temporarily pushing qudits into these higher levels. We show how these methods are able to more efficiently use the device, and where they see diminishing returns.
Authors:
; ;
Award ID(s):
2016136
Publication Date:
NSF-PAR ID:
10338373
Journal Name:
2022 IEEE 52nd International Symposium on Multiple-Valued Logic (ISMVL)
Page Range or eLocation-ID:
43 to 49
Sponsoring Org:
National Science Foundation
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