skip to main content

Search for: All records

Award ID contains: 2016136

Note: When clicking on a Digital Object Identifier (DOI) number, you will be taken to an external site maintained by the publisher. Some full text articles may not yet be available without a charge during the embargo (administrative interval).
What is a DOI Number?

Some links on this page may take you to non-federal websites. Their policies may differ from this site.

  1. Abstract

    Chipscale micro- and nano-optomechanical systems, hinging on the intangible radiation-pressure force, have shown their unique strength in sensing, signal transduction, and exploration of quantum physics with mechanical resonators. Optomechanical crystals, as one of the leading device platforms, enable simultaneous molding of the band structure of optical photons and microwave phonons with strong optomechanical coupling. Here, we demonstrate a new breed of optomechanical crystals in two-dimensional slab-on-substrate structures empowered by mechanical bound states in the continuum (BICs) at 8 GHz. We show symmetry-induced BIC emergence with optomechanical couplings up tog/2π≈ 2.5 MHz per unit cell, on par with low-dimensional optomechanical crystals. Our work paves the way towards exploration of photon-phonon interaction beyond suspended microcavities, which might lead to new applications of optomechanics from phonon sensing to quantum transduction.

  2. Abstract

    Surface acoustic waves are commonly used in classical electronics applications, and their use in quantum systems is beginning to be explored, as evidenced by recent experiments using acoustic Fabry–Pérot resonators. Here we explore their use for quantum communication, where we demonstrate a single-phonon surface acoustic wave transmission line, which links two physically separated qubit nodes. Each node comprises a microwave phonon transducer, an externally controlled superconducting variable coupler, and a superconducting qubit. Using this system, precisely shaped individual itinerant phonons are used to coherently transfer quantum information between the two physically distinct quantum nodes, enabling the high-fidelity node-to-node transfer of quantum states as well as the generation of a two-node Bell state. We further explore the dispersive interactions between an itinerant phonon emitted from one node and interacting with the superconducting qubit in the remote node. The observed interactions between the phonon and the remote qubit promise future quantum-optics-style experiments with itinerant phonons.

  3. This paper presents Giallar, a fully-automated verification toolkit for quantum compilers. Giallar requires no manual specifications, invariants, or proofs, and can automatically verify that a compiler pass preserves the semantics of quantum circuits. To deal with unbounded loops in quantum compilers, Giallar abstracts three loop templates, whose loop invariants can be automatically inferred. To efficiently check the equivalence of arbitrary input and output circuits that have complicated matrix semantics representation, Giallar introduces a symbolic representation for quantum circuits and a set of rewrite rules for showing the equivalence of symbolic quantum circuits. With Giallar, we implemented and verified 44 (out of 56) compiler passes in 13 versions of the Qiskit compiler, the open-source quantum compiler standard, during which three bugs were detected in and confirmed by Qiskit. Our evaluation shows that most of Qiskit compiler passes can be automatically verified in seconds and verification imposes only a modest overhead to compilation performance.
    Free, publicly-accessible full text available June 13, 2023
  4. Free, publicly-accessible full text available June 1, 2023
  5. Free, publicly-accessible full text available June 1, 2023
  6. Free, publicly-accessible full text available June 1, 2023
  7. Free, publicly-accessible full text available May 1, 2023
  8. Quantum computing promises speedup of classical algorithms in the long term. Current hardware is unable to support this goal and programs must be efficiently compiled to use of the devices through reduction of qubits used, gate count and circuit duration. Many quantum systems have access to higher levels, expanding the computational space for a device. We develop higher level qudit communication circuits, compilation pipelines, and circuits that take advantage of this extra space by temporarily pushing qudits into these higher levels. We show how these methods are able to more efficiently use the device, and where they see diminishing returns.
    Free, publicly-accessible full text available May 1, 2023
  9. Free, publicly-accessible full text available May 1, 2023
  10. Free, publicly-accessible full text available April 21, 2023