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  1. Abstract

    Chipscale micro- and nano-optomechanical systems, hinging on the intangible radiation-pressure force, have shown their unique strength in sensing, signal transduction, and exploration of quantum physics with mechanical resonators. Optomechanical crystals, as one of the leading device platforms, enable simultaneous molding of the band structure of optical photons and microwave phonons with strong optomechanical coupling. Here, we demonstrate a new breed of optomechanical crystals in two-dimensional slab-on-substrate structures empowered by mechanical bound states in the continuum (BICs) at 8 GHz. We show symmetry-induced BIC emergence with optomechanical couplings up tog/2π≈ 2.5 MHz per unit cell, on par with low-dimensional optomechanical crystals. Our work paves the way towards exploration of photon-phonon interaction beyond suspended microcavities, which might lead to new applications of optomechanics from phonon sensing to quantum transduction.

     
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  2. Abstract

    Surface acoustic waves are commonly used in classical electronics applications, and their use in quantum systems is beginning to be explored, as evidenced by recent experiments using acoustic Fabry–Pérot resonators. Here we explore their use for quantum communication, where we demonstrate a single-phonon surface acoustic wave transmission line, which links two physically separated qubit nodes. Each node comprises a microwave phonon transducer, an externally controlled superconducting variable coupler, and a superconducting qubit. Using this system, precisely shaped individual itinerant phonons are used to coherently transfer quantum information between the two physically distinct quantum nodes, enabling the high-fidelity node-to-node transfer of quantum states as well as the generation of a two-node Bell state. We further explore the dispersive interactions between an itinerant phonon emitted from one node and interacting with the superconducting qubit in the remote node. The observed interactions between the phonon and the remote qubit promise future quantum-optics-style experiments with itinerant phonons.

     
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  3. An interspersed array of Cs and Rb atoms was used to implement a protocol for the correction of correlated errors. 
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    Free, publicly-accessible full text available June 23, 2024
  4. A beam splitter for phonons completes the toolbox required to develop a mechanically based quantum computing system. 
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    Free, publicly-accessible full text available June 9, 2024
  5. Free, publicly-accessible full text available May 1, 2024
  6. This paper presents a technique for rapid site-selective control of the quantum state of particles in a large array using the combination of a fast deflector (e.g., an acousto-optic deflector) and a relatively slow spatial light modulator (SLM). The use of SLMs for site-selective quantum state manipulation has been limited due to slow transition times that prevent rapid, consecutive quantum gates. By partitioning the SLM into multiple segments and using a fast deflector to transition between them, it is possible to substantially reduce the average time increment between scanner transitions by increasing the number of gates that can be performed for a single SLM full-frame setting. We analyzed the performance of this device in two different configurations: In configuration 1, each SLM segment addresses the full qubit array; in configuration 2, each SLM segment addresses a subarray and an additional fast deflector positions that subarray with respect to the full qubit array. With these hybrid scanners, we calculated qubit addressing rates that are tens to hundreds of times faster than using an SLM alone.

     
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  7. Free, publicly-accessible full text available April 1, 2024
  8. Free, publicly-accessible full text available April 1, 2024
  9. Quantum systems have the potential to demonstrate significant computational advantage, but current quantum devices suffer from the rapid accumulation of error that prevents the storage of quantum information over extended periods. The unintentional coupling of qubits to their environment and each other adds significant noise to computation, and improved methods to combat decoherence are required to boost the performance of quantum algorithms on real machines. While many existing techniques for mitigating error rely on adding extra gates to the circuit [ 13 , 20 , 56 ], calibrating new gates [ 50 ], or extending a circuit’s runtime [ 32 ], this article’s primary contribution leverages the gates already present in a quantum program without extending circuit duration. We exploit circuit slack for single-qubit gates that occur in idle windows, scheduling the gates such that their timing can counteract some errors. Spin-echo corrections that mitigate decoherence on idling qubits act as inspiration for this work. Theoretical models, however, fail to capture all sources of noise in Noisy Intermediate Scale Quantum devices, making practical solutions necessary that better minimize the impact of unpredictable errors in quantum machines. This article presents TimeStitch: a novel framework that pinpoints the optimum execution schedules for single-qubit gates within quantum circuits. TimeStitch, implemented as a compilation pass, leverages the reversible nature of quantum computation to boost the success of circuits on real quantum machines. Unlike past approaches that apply reversibility properties to improve quantum circuit execution [ 35 ], TimeStitch amplifies fidelity without violating critical path frontiers in either the slack tuning procedures or the final rescheduled circuit. On average, compared to a state-of-the-art baseline, a practically constrained TimeStitch achieves a mean 38% relative improvement in success rates, with a maximum of 106%, while observing bounds on circuit depth. When unconstrained by depth criteria, TimeStitch produces a mean relative fidelity increase of 50% with a maximum of 256%. Finally, when TimeStitch intelligently leverages periodic dynamical decoupling within its scheduling framework, a mean 64% improvement is observed over the baseline, relatively outperforming stand-alone dynamical decoupling by 19%, with a maximum of 287%. 
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    Free, publicly-accessible full text available March 31, 2024
  10. Free, publicly-accessible full text available March 23, 2024