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Title: Progress report on computing the disconnected QCD and the QCD plus QED hadronic contributions to the muon’s anomalous magnetic moment.
We report progress on calculating the contribution to the anomalous magnetic moment of the muon from the disconnected hadronic diagrams with light and strange quarks and the valence QED contribution to the connected diagrams. The lattice QCD calculations use the highly- improved staggered quark (HISQ) formulation. The gauge configurations were generated by the MILC Collaboration with four flavors of HISQ sea quarks with physical sea-quark masses.
Authors:
; ; ; ; ; ; ; ; ; ; ; ;
Award ID(s):
2013064
Publication Date:
NSF-PAR ID:
10340518
Journal Name:
The 38th International Symposium on Lattice Field Theory (LATTICE2021)
Page Range or eLocation-ID:
039
Sponsoring Org:
National Science Foundation
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