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This content will become publicly available on March 15, 2023

Title: Evaluating Coupled Climate Model Parameterizations via Skill at Reproducing the Monsoon Intraseasonal Oscillation
Abstract Empirically generated indices are used to evaluate the skill of a global climate model in representing the monsoon intraseasonal oscillation (MISO). This work adapts the method of Suhas et al., an extended empirical orthogonal function (EEOF) analysis of daily rainfall data with the first orthogonal function indicating MISO strength and phase. This method is applied to observed rainfall and Community Earth System Model (CESM1.2) simulation results. Variants of the CESM1.2 including upper ocean parameterizations for Langmuir turbulence and submesoscale mixed layer eddy restratification are used together with the EEOF analysis to explore sensitivity of the MISO to global upper ocean process representations. The skill with which the model variants recreate the MISO strength and persistence is evaluated versus the observed MISO. While all model versions reproduce the northward rainfall propagation traditionally associated with the MISO, a version including both Langmuir turbulence and submesoscale restratification parameterizations provides the most accurate simulations of the time scale of MISO events.
Authors:
; ; ; ;
Award ID(s):
1655221
Publication Date:
NSF-PAR ID:
10340595
Journal Name:
Journal of Climate
Volume:
35
Issue:
6
Page Range or eLocation-ID:
1873 to 1884
ISSN:
0894-8755
Sponsoring Org:
National Science Foundation
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