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This content will become publicly available on April 8, 2023

Title: Effect of environmental signals on growth and development in mosses
Abstract Plants perceive a multitude of environmental signals and stresses, and integrate their response to them in ways that culminate in modified phenotypes, optimized for plant survival. This ability of plants, known as phenotypic plasticity, is found throughout evolution, in all plant lineages. For any given environment, the specifics of the response to a particular signal may vary depending on the plants’ unique physiology and ecological niche. The bryophyte lineage, including mosses, which diverged from the vascular plants ~450–430 million years ago, represent a unique ecological and phylogenetic group in plant evolution. Several aspects of the moss life cycle, their morphology including the presence of specialized tissue types and distinct anatomical features, gene repertoires and networks, as well as the habitat differ significantly from those of vascular plants. To evaluate the outcomes of these differences, we explore the phenotypic responses of mosses to environmental signals such as light, temperature, CO2, water, nutrients, and gravity, and compare those with what is known in vascular plants. We also outline knowledge gaps and formulate testable hypotheses based on the contribution of anatomical and molecular factors to specific phenotypic responses.
Authors:
;
Editors:
Petraglia, Alessandro
Award ID(s):
1921724 1714693
Publication Date:
NSF-PAR ID:
10341463
Journal Name:
Journal of Experimental Botany
Volume:
73
Issue:
13
Page Range or eLocation-ID:
4514 to 4527
ISSN:
0022-0957
Sponsoring Org:
National Science Foundation
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