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Title: V -band photometry of asteroids from ASAS-SN: Finding asteroids with slow spin
We present V -band photometry of the 20 000 brightest asteroids using data from the All-Sky Automated Survey for Supernovae (ASAS-SN) between 2012 and 2018. We were able to apply the convex inversion method to more than 5000 asteroids with more than 60 good measurements in order to derive their sidereal rotation periods, spin axis orientations, and shape models. We derive unique spin state and shape solutions for 760 asteroids, including 163 new determinations. This corresponds to a success rate of about 15%, which is significantly higher than the success rate previously achieved using photometry from surveys. We derive the first sidereal rotation periods for additional 69 asteroids. We find good agreement in spin periods and pole orientations for objects with prior solutions. We obtain a statistical sample of asteroid physical properties that is sufficient for the detection of several previously known trends, such as the underrepresentation of slow rotators in current databases, and the anisotropic distribution of spin orientations driven by the nongravitational forces. We also investigate the dependence of spin orientations on the rotation period. Since 2018, ASAS-SN has been observing the sky with higher cadence and a deeper limiting magnitude, which will lead to many more new more » solutions in just a few years. « less
Authors:
; ; ; ; ;
Award ID(s):
1908570 1814440
Publication Date:
NSF-PAR ID:
10342148
Journal Name:
Astronomy & Astrophysics
Volume:
654
Page Range or eLocation-ID:
A48
ISSN:
0004-6361
Sponsoring Org:
National Science Foundation
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