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Title: Tidal Disruption on Stellar-mass Black Holes in Active Galactic Nuclei
Abstract Active galactic nuclei (AGNs) can funnel stars and stellar remnants from the vicinity of the galactic center into the inner plane of the AGN disk. Stars reaching this inner region can be tidally disrupted by the stellar-mass black holes in the disk. Such micro tidal disruption events (micro-TDEs) could be a useful probe of stellar interaction with the AGN disk. We find that micro-TDEs in AGNs occur at a rate of ∼170 Gpc −3 yr −1 . Their cleanest observational probe may be the electromagnetic detection of tidal disruption in AGNs by heavy supermassive black holes ( M • ≳ 10 8 M ⊙ ) that cannot tidally disrupt solar-type stars. The reconstructed rate of such events from observations, nonetheless, appears to be much lower than our estimated micro-TDE rate. We discuss two such micro-TDE candidates observed to date (ASASSN-15lh and ZTF19aailpwl).
Authors:
; ; ; ; ; ; ;
Award ID(s):
2006839 1715661
Publication Date:
NSF-PAR ID:
10342633
Journal Name:
The Astrophysical Journal Letters
Volume:
933
Issue:
2
Page Range or eLocation-ID:
L28
ISSN:
2041-8205
Sponsoring Org:
National Science Foundation
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