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Title: A quantum walk control plane for distributed quantum computing in quantum networks
Quantum networks are complex systems formed by the interaction among quantum processors through quantum channels. Analogous to classical computer networks, quantum networks allow for the distribution of quantum computation among quantum computers. In this work, we describe a quantum walk protocol to perform distributed quantum computing in a quantum network. The protocol uses a quantum walk as a quantum control signal to perform distributed quantum operations. We consider a generalization of the discrete-time coined quantum walk model that accounts for the interaction between a quantum walker system in the network graph with quantum registers inside the network nodes. The protocol logically captures distributed quantum computing, abstracting hardware implementation and the transmission of quantum information through channels. Control signal transmission is mapped to the propagation of the walker system across the network, while interactions between the control layer and the quantum registers are embedded into the application of coin operators. We demonstrate how to use the quantum walker system to perform a distributed CNOT operation, which shows the universality of the protocol for distributed quantum computing. Furthermore, we apply the protocol to the task of entanglement distribution in a quantum network.  more » « less
Award ID(s):
1955744
NSF-PAR ID:
10343100
Author(s) / Creator(s):
; ; ;
Date Published:
Journal Name:
2021 IEEE International Conference on Quantum Computing and Engineering (QCE)
Page Range / eLocation ID:
313 to 323
Format(s):
Medium: X
Sponsoring Org:
National Science Foundation
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