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Title: The search of higher multipole radiation in gravitational waves from compact binary coalescences by a minimally-modelled pipeline
Abstract The coherent WaveBurst (cWB) pipeline implements a minimally-modelled search to find a coherent response in the network of gravitational wave detectors of the LIGO-Virgo Col-laboration in the time-frequency domain. In this manuscript, we provide a timely introduction to an extension of the cWB analysis to detect spectral features beyond the main quadrupolar emission of gravitational waves during the inspiral phase of compact binary coalescences; more detailed discussion will be provided in a forthcoming paper [1]. The search is performed by defining specific regions in the time-frequency map to extract the energy of harmonics of main quadrupole mode in the inspiral phase. This method has already been used in the GW190814 discovery paper (Astrophys. J. Lett. 896 L44). Here we show the procedure to detect the (3, 3) multipole in GW190814 within the cWB framework.
Authors:
; ; ; ; ; ; ; ; ; ; ; ; ; ; ;
Award ID(s):
2110060
Publication Date:
NSF-PAR ID:
10344397
Journal Name:
Journal of Physics: Conference Series
Volume:
2156
Issue:
1
Page Range or eLocation-ID:
012081
ISSN:
1742-6588
Sponsoring Org:
National Science Foundation
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