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Title: Consistency Regularization with High-dimensional Non-adversarial Source-guided Perturbation for Unsupervised Domain Adaptation in Segmentation
Unsupervised domain adaptation for semantic segmentation has been intensively studied due to the low cost of the pixel-level annotation for synthetic data. The most common approaches try to generate images or features mimicking the distribution in the target domain while preserving the semantic contents in the source domain so that a model can be trained with annotations from the latter. However, such methods highly rely on an image translator or feature extractor trained in an elaborated mechanism including adversarial training, which brings in extra complexity and instability in the adaptation process. Furthermore, these methods mainly focus on taking advantage of the labeled source dataset, leaving the unlabeled target dataset not fully utilized. In this paper, we propose a bidirectional style-induced domain adaptation method, called BiSIDA, that employs consistency regularization to efficiently exploit information from the unlabeled target domain dataset, requiring only a simple neural style transfer model. BiSIDA aligns domains by not only transferring source images into the style of target images but also transferring target images into the style of source images to perform high-dimensional perturbation on the unlabeled target images, which is crucial to the success in applying consistency regularization in segmentation tasks. Extensive experiments show that our more » BiSIDA achieves new state-of-the-art on two commonly-used synthetic-to-real domain adaptation benchmarks: GTA5-to-CityScapes and SYNTHIA-to-CityScapes. Code and pretrained style transfer model are available at: https://github.com/wangkaihong/BiSIDA. « less
Authors:
; ;
Award ID(s):
1838193
Publication Date:
NSF-PAR ID:
10345976
Journal Name:
Proceedings of the Thirty-Fifth AAAI Conference on Artificial Intelligence (AAAI-21)
Volume:
35
Issue:
11
Page Range or eLocation-ID:
10138 - 10146
Sponsoring Org:
National Science Foundation
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