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This content will become publicly available on August 1, 2023

Title: The DECam Local Volume Exploration Survey Data Release 2
Abstract We present the second public data release (DR2) from the DECam Local Volume Exploration survey (DELVE). DELVE DR2 combines new DECam observations with archival DECam data from the Dark Energy Survey, the DECam Legacy Survey, and other DECam community programs. DELVE DR2 consists of ∼160,000 exposures that cover >21,000 deg 2 of the high-Galactic-latitude (∣ b ∣ > 10°) sky in four broadband optical/near-infrared filters ( g , r , i , z ). DELVE DR2 provides point-source and automatic aperture photometry for ∼2.5 billion astronomical sources with a median 5 σ point-source depth of g = 24.3, r = 23.9, i = 23.5, and z = 22.8 mag. A region of ∼17,000 deg 2 has been imaged in all four filters, providing four-band photometric measurements for ∼618 million astronomical sources. DELVE DR2 covers more than 4 times the area of the previous DELVE data release and contains roughly 5 times as many astronomical objects. DELVE DR2 is publicly available via the NOIRLab Astro Data Lab science platform.
Authors:
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Award ID(s):
2108168 1816196 1814208 2108169
Publication Date:
NSF-PAR ID:
10346880
Journal Name:
The Astrophysical Journal Supplement Series
Volume:
261
Issue:
2
Page Range or eLocation-ID:
38
ISSN:
0067-0049
Sponsoring Org:
National Science Foundation
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