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Title: Regimes of cosmic-ray diffusion in Galactic turbulence
Abstract Cosmic-ray transport in astrophysical environments is often dominated by the diffusion of particles in a magnetic field composed of both a turbulent and a mean component. This process, which is two-fold turbulent mixing in that the particle motion is stochastic with respect to the field lines, needs to be understood in order to properly model cosmic-ray signatures. One of the most important aspects in the modeling of cosmic-ray diffusion is that fully resonant scattering, the most effective such process, is only possible if the wave spectrum covers the entire range of propagation angles. By taking the wave spectrum boundaries into account, we quantify cosmic-ray diffusion parallel and perpendicular to the guide field direction at turbulence levels above 5% of the total magnetic field. We apply our results of the parallel and perpendicular diffusion coefficient to the Milky Way. We show that simple purely diffusive transport is in conflict with observations of the inner Galaxy, but that just by taking a Galactic wind into account, data can be matched in the central 5 kpc zone. Further comparison shows that the outer Galaxy at $$>5$$ > 5  kpc, on the other hand, should be dominated by perpendicular diffusion, likely changing to more » parallel diffusion at the outermost radii of the Milky Way. « less
Authors:
; ; ; ; ;
Award ID(s):
2007323
Publication Date:
NSF-PAR ID:
10348583
Journal Name:
SN Applied Sciences
Volume:
4
Issue:
1
ISSN:
2523-3963
Sponsoring Org:
National Science Foundation
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