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This content will become publicly available on June 22, 2023

Title: Citizen Science as an Ecosystem of Engagement: Implications for Learning and Broadening Participation
Abstract The bulk of research on citizen science participants is project centric, based on an assumption that volunteers experience a single project. Contrary to this assumption, survey responses (n = 3894) and digital trace data (n = 3649) from volunteers, who collectively engaged in 1126 unique projects, revealed that multiproject participation was the norm. Only 23% of volunteers were singletons (who participated in only one project). The remaining multiproject participants were split evenly between discipline specialists (39%) and discipline spanners (38% joined projects with different disciplinary topics) and unevenly between mode specialists (52%) and mode spanners (25% participated in online and offline projects). Public engagement was narrow: The multiproject participants were eight times more likely to be White and five times more likely to hold advanced degrees than the general population. We propose a volunteer-centric framework that explores how the dynamic accumulation of experiences in a project ecosystem can support broad learning objectives and inclusive citizen science.
Authors:
; ; ; ; ; ;
Award ID(s):
1713562
Publication Date:
NSF-PAR ID:
10348993
Journal Name:
BioScience
Volume:
72
Issue:
7
Page Range or eLocation-ID:
651 to 663
ISSN:
0006-3568
Sponsoring Org:
National Science Foundation
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