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This content will become publicly available on June 1, 2023

Title: A Speed Bump: SN 2021aefx Shows that Doppler Shift Alone Can Explain Early Excess Blue Flux in Some Type Ia Supernovae
Abstract We present early-time photometric and spectroscopic observations of the Type Ia supernova (SN Ia) 2021aefx. The early-time u -band light curve shows an excess flux when compared to normal SNe Ia. We suggest that the early excess blue flux may be due to a rapid change in spectral velocity in the first few days post explosion, produced by the emission of the Ca ii H&K feature passing from the u to the B bands on the timescale of a few days. This effect could be dominant for all SNe Ia that have broad absorption features and early-time velocities over 25,000 km s −1 . It is likely to be one of the main causes of early excess u -band flux in SNe Ia that have early-time high velocities. This effect may also be dominant in the UV filters, as well as in places where the SN spectral energy distribution is quickly rising to longer wavelengths. The rapid change in velocity can only produce a monotonic change (in flux-space) in the u band. For objects that explode at lower velocities, and have a more structured shape in the early excess emission, there must also be an additional parameter producing the more » early-time diversity. More early-time observations, in particular early spectra, are required to determine how prominent this effect is within SNe Ia. « less
Authors:
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Award ID(s):
1715133
Publication Date:
NSF-PAR ID:
10351306
Journal Name:
The Astrophysical Journal Letters
Volume:
932
Issue:
1
Page Range or eLocation-ID:
L2
ISSN:
2041-8205
Sponsoring Org:
National Science Foundation
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