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This content will become publicly available on June 29, 2023

Title: Culturally Responsive Storytelling Across Content Areas Using American Indian Ledger Art and Physical Computing
In July 2021, Computer Science (CS) standards were officially added as a subject area within the K-12 Montana content standards. However, due to a lack of professional development and pre-service preparation in CS, schools and teachers in Montana are underprepared to implement these standards. Montana is also a unique state, since American Indian education is mandated by the state constitution in what is known as the Indian Education for All Act. We are developing elementary and middle school units and teacher training materials that simultaneously address CS, Indian Education, and other Montana content standards. In this paper, we present a unit for fourth through sixth grades using a participatory design approach. Through physical computing, students create a visual narrative of their own stories inspired by ledger art, an American Indian art medium for recording lived experiences. We discuss the affordances and challenges of an integrated approach to CS teaching and learning in elementary and middle schools in Montana.
Authors:
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Award ID(s):
2031795
Publication Date:
NSF-PAR ID:
10353710
Journal Name:
ASEE Annual Meeting NSF Grantees Poster Session
Sponsoring Org:
National Science Foundation
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