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Title: Towards Better Meta-Initialization with Task Augmentation for Kindergarten-Aged Speech Recognition
Children’s automatic speech recognition (ASR) is always difficult due to, in part, the data scarcity problem, especially for kindergarten-aged kids. When data are scarce, the model might overfit to the training data, and hence good starting points for training are essential. Recently, meta-learning was proposed to learn model initialization (MI) for ASR tasks of different languages. This method leads to good performance when the model is adapted to an unseen language. How-ever, MI is vulnerable to overfitting on training tasks (learner overfitting). It is also unknown whether MI generalizes to other low-resource tasks. In this paper, we validate the effectiveness of MI in children’s ASR and attempt to alleviate the problem of learner overfitting. To achieve model-agnostic meta-learning (MAML), we regard children’s speech at each age as a different task. In terms of learner overfitting, we propose a task-level augmentation method by simulating new ages using frequency warping techniques. Detailed experiments are conducted to show the impact of task augmentation on each age for kindergarten-aged speech. As a result, our approach achieves a relative word error rate (WER) improvement of 51% over the baseline system with no augmentation or initialization.  more » « less
Award ID(s):
1734380
NSF-PAR ID:
10354759
Author(s) / Creator(s):
; ;
Date Published:
Journal Name:
Proceedings of the IEEE ICASSP
Page Range / eLocation ID:
8582 to 8586
Format(s):
Medium: X
Sponsoring Org:
National Science Foundation
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