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Title: World Atlas of late Quaternary Foraminiferal Oxygen and Carbon Isotope Ratios
Abstract. We present a global atlas of downcore foraminiferal oxygen and carbon isotope ratios available at https://doi.org/10.1594/PANGAEA.936747(Mulitza et al., 2021a). The database contains 2106 published and previously unpublished stable isotope downcore records with 361 949 stable isotopevalues of various planktic and benthic species of Foraminifera from 1265 sediment cores. Age constraints are provided by 6153 uncalibratedradiocarbon ages from 598 (47 %) of the cores. Each stable isotope and radiocarbon series is provided in a separate netCDF file containingfundamental metadata as attributes. The data set can be managed and explored with the free software tool PaleoDataView. The atlas will provideimportant data for paleoceanographic analyses and compilations, site surveys, or for teaching marine stratigraphy. The database can be updated withnew records as they are generated, providing a live ongoing resource into the future.  more » « less
Award ID(s):
2103032 1924215
NSF-PAR ID:
10356084
Author(s) / Creator(s):
; ; ; ; ; ; ; ; ; ; ; ; ; ; ; ; ; ; ; more » ; ; ; ; ; ; ; ; « less
Date Published:
Journal Name:
Earth System Science Data
Volume:
14
Issue:
6
ISSN:
1866-3516
Page Range / eLocation ID:
2553 to 2611
Format(s):
Medium: X
Sponsoring Org:
National Science Foundation
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