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Title: Sodium-based solid electrolytes and interfacial stability. Towards solid-state sodium batteries
Electrochemical energy storage is a cost-effective, sustainable method for storing and delivering energy gener- ated from renewable resources. Among electrochemical energy storage devices, the lithium-ion battery (LIB) has dominated due to its high energy and power density. The success of LIBs has generated increased interest in sodium-ion battery (NaB) technology amid concerns of the sustainability and cost of lithium resources. In recent years, numerous studies have shown that sodium-ion solid-state electrolytes (NaSEs) have considerable potential to enable new cell chemistries that can deliver superior electrochemical performance to liquid-electrolyte-based NaBs. However, their commercial implementation is hindered by slow ionic transport at ambient and chemical/ mechanical incompatibility at interfaces. In this review, various NaSEs are first characterized based on individual crystal structures and ionic conduction mechanisms. Subsequently, selected methods of modifying interfaces in sodium solid-state batteries (NaSSBs) are covered, including anode wetting, ionic liquid (IL) addition, and composite polymer electrolytes (CPEs). Finally, examples are provided of how these techniques improve cycle life and rate performance of different cathode materials including sulfur, oxide, hexacyanoferrate, and phosphate-type. A focus on interfacial modification and optimization is crucial for realizing next-generation batteries. Thus, the novel methods reviewed here could pave the way toward a NaSSB capable more » of with- standing the high current and cycle life demands of future applications. « less
Authors:
; ; ;
Award ID(s):
1926199
Publication Date:
NSF-PAR ID:
10357013
Journal Name:
Materials today communications
Volume:
32
Page Range or eLocation-ID:
104009
ISSN:
2352-4928
Sponsoring Org:
National Science Foundation
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