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Title: Experimental studies on astrophysical reactions at the low-energy RI beam separator CRIB
Experimental studies on astrophysical reactions involving radioactive isotopes (RI) often accompany technical challenges. Studies on such nuclear reactions have been conducted at the low-energy RI beam separator CRIB, operated by Center for Nuclear Study, the University of Tokyo. We discuss two cases of astrophysical reaction studies at CRIB; one is for the 7 Be+ n reactions which may affect the primordial 7 Li abundance in the Big-Bang nucleosynthesis, and the other is for the 22 Mg( α , p ) reaction relevantin X-raybursts.
Authors:
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Editors:
Liu, W.; Wang, Y.; Guo, B.; Tang, X.; Zeng, S.
Award ID(s):
1927130
Publication Date:
NSF-PAR ID:
10358449
Journal Name:
EPJ Web of Conferences
Volume:
260
Page Range or eLocation-ID:
03003
ISSN:
2100-014X
Sponsoring Org:
National Science Foundation
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