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Title: When the Data Drive the Learning

What happens when a diverse group of youth ages 11 through 14 are introduced to data science using authentic, public, multivariate data in an out-of-school context assuming no special prerequisite knowledge? We designed three 10-hour Data Club modules in which real-world data and the questions students asked of such data drove the learning process. Each module was grounded in a topic that youth connected with at a personal level. Youth learned how to use a free online data platform that made it easy to rearrange, group, filter, and graph data. Within the progression of the module, we used youths’ own questions, data moves, and data visualizations to engage them in critical inquiry and foster productive habits of mind for working with data. Our goal was for youth to emerge from the Data Clubs experience feeling empowered to interact with, ask questions of, and reason about and from data.

 
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Award ID(s):
1917653 1742255
NSF-PAR ID:
10359337
Author(s) / Creator(s):
; ; ; ;
Date Published:
Journal Name:
Proceedings of the 2021 International Association for Statistical Education Satellite Conference
Format(s):
Medium: X
Sponsoring Org:
National Science Foundation
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