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Title: Identification of all-against-all protein–protein interactions based on deep hash learning
Abstract Background

Protein–protein interaction (PPI) is vital for life processes, disease treatment, and drug discovery. The computational prediction of PPI is relatively inexpensive and efficient when compared to traditional wet-lab experiments. Given a new protein, one may wish to find whether the protein has any PPI relationship with other existing proteins. Current computational PPI prediction methods usually compare the new protein to existing proteins one by one in a pairwise manner. This is time consuming.

Results

In this work, we propose a more efficient model, called deep hash learning protein-and-protein interaction (DHL-PPI), to predict all-against-all PPI relationships in a database of proteins. First, DHL-PPI encodes a protein sequence into a binary hash code based on deep features extracted from the protein sequences using deep learning techniques. This encoding scheme enables us to turn the PPI discrimination problem into a much simpler searching problem. The binary hash code for a protein sequence can be regarded as a number. Thus, in the pre-screening stage of DHL-PPI, the string matching problem of comparing a protein sequence against a database withMproteins can be transformed into a much more simpler problem: to find a number inside a sorted array of lengthM. This pre-screening process narrows down the search to a much smaller set of candidate proteins for further confirmation. As a final step, DHL-PPI uses the Hamming distance to verify the final PPI relationship.

Conclusions

The experimental results confirmed that DHL-PPI is feasible and effective. Using a dataset with strictly negative PPI examples of four species, DHL-PPI is shown to be superior or competitive when compared to the other state-of-the-art methods in terms of precision, recall or F1 score. Furthermore, in the prediction stage, the proposed DHL-PPI reduced the time complexity from$$O(M^2)$$O(M2)to$$O(M\log M)$$O(MlogM)for performing an all-against-all PPI prediction for a database withMproteins. With the proposed approach, a protein database can be preprocessed and stored for later search using the proposed encoding scheme. This can provide a more efficient way to cope with the rapidly increasing volume of protein datasets.

 
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Award ID(s):
1816005
NSF-PAR ID:
10368623
Author(s) / Creator(s):
; ; ; ; ;
Publisher / Repository:
Springer Science + Business Media
Date Published:
Journal Name:
BMC Bioinformatics
Volume:
23
Issue:
1
ISSN:
1471-2105
Format(s):
Medium: X
Sponsoring Org:
National Science Foundation
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