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Title: The metacoupled Arctic: Human–nature interactions across local to global scales as drivers of sustainability
Abstract

The Arctic is an epicenter of complex environmental and socioeconomic change. Strengthened connections between Arctic and non-Arctic systems could threaten or enhance Arctic sustainability, but studies of external influences on the Arctic are scattered and fragmented in academic literature. Here, we review and synthesize how external influences have been analyzed in Arctic-coupled human and natural systems (CHANS) literature. Results show that the Arctic is affected by numerous external influences nearby and faraway, including global markets, climate change, governance, military security, and tourism. However, apart from climate change, these connections are infrequently the focus of Arctic CHANS analyses. We demonstrate how Arctic CHANS research could be enhanced and research gaps could be filled using the holistic framework of metacoupling (human–nature interactions within as well as between adjacent and distant systems). Our perspectives provide new approaches to enhance the sustainability of Arctic systems in an interconnected world.

Authors:
; ; ;
Award ID(s):
2033507 1924111
Publication Date:
NSF-PAR ID:
10369741
Journal Name:
Ambio
Volume:
51
Issue:
10
Page Range or eLocation-ID:
p. 2061-2078
ISSN:
0044-7447
Publisher:
Springer Science + Business Media
Sponsoring Org:
National Science Foundation
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