skip to main content

Title: Optomechanical crystal with bound states in the continuum
Abstract

Chipscale micro- and nano-optomechanical systems, hinging on the intangible radiation-pressure force, have shown their unique strength in sensing, signal transduction, and exploration of quantum physics with mechanical resonators. Optomechanical crystals, as one of the leading device platforms, enable simultaneous molding of the band structure of optical photons and microwave phonons with strong optomechanical coupling. Here, we demonstrate a new breed of optomechanical crystals in two-dimensional slab-on-substrate structures empowered by mechanical bound states in the continuum (BICs) at 8 GHz. We show symmetry-induced BIC emergence with optomechanical couplings up tog/2π≈ 2.5 MHz per unit cell, on par with low-dimensional optomechanical crystals. Our work paves the way towards exploration of photon-phonon interaction beyond suspended microcavities, which might lead to new applications of optomechanics from phonon sensing to quantum transduction.

Authors:
; ;
Award ID(s):
2016136 2137642 1944728
Publication Date:
NSF-PAR ID:
10369784
Journal Name:
Nature Communications
Volume:
13
Issue:
1
ISSN:
2041-1723
Publisher:
Nature Publishing Group
Sponsoring Org:
National Science Foundation
More Like this
  1. Abstract

    Optomechanical systems offer new opportunities in quantum information processing and quantum sensing. Many solid-state quantum devices operate at millikelvin temperatures—however, it has proven challenging to operate nanoscale optomechanical devices at these ultralow temperatures due to their limited thermal conductance and parasitic optical absorption. Here, we present a two-dimensional optomechanical crystal resonator capable of achieving large cooperativityCand small effective bath occupancynb, resulting in a quantum cooperativityCeff ≡ C/nb > 1 under continuous-wave optical driving. This is realized using a two-dimensional phononic bandgap structure to host the optomechanical cavity, simultaneously isolating the acoustic mode of interest in the bandgap while allowing heat to be removed by phonon modes outside of the bandgap. This achievement paves the way for a variety of applications requiring quantum-coherent optomechanical interactions, such as transducers capable of bi-directional conversion of quantum states between microwave frequency superconducting quantum circuits and optical photons in a fiber optic network.

  2. Abstract

    Hybrid quantum systems are essential for the realization of distributed quantum networks. In particular, piezo-mechanics operating at typical superconducting qubit frequencies features low thermal excitations, and offers an appealing platform to bridge superconducting quantum processors and optical telecommunication channels. However, integrating superconducting and optomechanical elements at cryogenic temperatures with sufficiently strong interactions remains a tremendous challenge. Here, we report an integrated superconducting cavity piezo-optomechanical platform where 10 GHz phonons are resonantly coupled with photons in a superconducting cavity and a nanophotonic cavity at the same time. Taking advantage of the large piezo-mechanical cooperativity (Cem ~7) and the enhanced optomechanical coupling boosted by a pulsed optical pump, we demonstrate coherent interactions at cryogenic temperatures via the observation of efficient microwave-optical photon conversion. This hybrid interface makes a substantial step towards quantum communication at large scale, as well as novel explorations in microwave-optical photon entanglement and quantum sensing mediated by gigahertz phonons.

  3. Abstract

    Phonon trapping has an immense impact in many areas of science and technology, from the antennas of interferometric gravitational wave detectors to chip-scale quantum micro- and nano-mechanical oscillators. It usually relies on the mechanical suspension—an approach, while isolating selected vibrational modes, leads to serious drawbacks for interrogation of the trapped phonons, including limited heat capacity and excess noises via measurements. To circumvent these constraints, we realize a paradigm of phonon trapping using mechanical bound states in the continuum (BICs) with topological features and conducted an in-depth characterization of the mechanical losses both at room and cryogenic temperatures. Our findings of mechanical BICs combining the microwave frequency and macroscopic size unveil a unique platform for realizing mechanical oscillators in both classical and quantum regimes. The paradigm of mechanical BICs might lead to unprecedented sensing modalities for applications such as rare-event searches and the exploration of the foundations of quantum mechanics in unreached parameter spaces.

  4. Abstract

    In most practical scenarios, optical susceptibilities can be treated as a local property of a medium. For example, in the context of nonlinear optics we can typically treat the Kerr and Raman response as local, such that optical fields at one location do not produce a nonlinear response at distinct locations in space. This is because the electronic and vibrational disturbances produced within the material are confined to a region that is smaller than an optical wavelength. By comparison, Brillouin interactions, mediated by traveling-wave acoustic phonons, can result in a highly nonlocal nonlinear response as the elastic waves generated in the process can occupy a region in space much larger than an optical wavelength. The unique properties of these interactions can be exploited to engineer new types of processes, where highly delocalized phonon modes serve as an engineerable channel that mediates scattering processes between light waves propagating in distinct optical waveguides. These types of nonlocal optomechanical responses have recently been demonstrated as the basis for information transduction, however the nontrivial dynamics of such systems has yet to be explored. In this work, we show that the third-order nonlinear process resulting from spatially extended Brillouin-active phonon modes involves mixing productsmore »from spatially separated, optically decoupled waveguides, yielding a nonlocal susceptibility. Building on these concepts, we illustrate how nontrivial multi-mode acoustic interference can produce a nonlocal susceptibility with a multi-pole frequency response, as the basis for new optical and microwave signal processing schemes within traveling wave systems.

    « less
  5. Abstract

    Experimental exploration of synchronization in scalable oscillator microsystems has unfolded a deeper understanding of networks, collective phenomena, and signal processing. Cavity optomechanical devices have played an important role in this scenario, with the perspective of bridging optical and radio frequencies through nonlinear classical and quantum synchronization concepts. In its simplest form, synchronization occurs when an oscillator is entrained by a signal with frequency nearby the oscillator’s tone, and becomes increasingly challenging as their frequency detuning increases. Here, we experimentally demonstrate entrainment of a silicon-nitride optomechanical oscillator driven up to the fourth harmonic of its 32 MHz fundamental frequency. Exploring this effect, we also experimentally demonstrate a purely optomechanical RF frequency divider, where we performed frequency division up to a 4:1 ratio, i.e., from 128 MHz to 32 MHz. Further developments could harness these effects towards frequency synthesizers, phase-sensitive amplification and nonlinear sensing.