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Title: Photonic Platforms Using In‐Plane Optical Anisotropy of Tin (II) Selenide and Black Phosphorus
Authors:
 ;  ;  ;  ;  ;  
Publication Date:
NSF-PAR ID:
10370164
Journal Name:
Advanced Photonics Research
Volume:
2
Issue:
12
ISSN:
2699-9293
Publisher:
Wiley Blackwell (John Wiley & Sons)
Sponsoring Org:
National Science Foundation
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