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Title: A stark future for ocean life
The year 2021 marked the highest temperature and likely the lowest oxygen content for the oceans since human records began ( 1 , 2 ). These changes have put marine species on the front lines of climate change. For example, marine species’ geographical ranges are shifting faster and experiencing more contractions than those of terrestrial species ( 3 , 4 ). However, whether climate change poses an existential threat to ocean life has been less clear. Marine species are often considered to be more resilient to extinction than terrestrial ones, and human-caused global extinctions of marine species have been relatively rare ( 5 ). On page 524 of this issue, Penn and Deutsch ( 6 ) present extensive modeling to reveal that runaway climate change would put ocean life on track for a mass extinction rivaling the worst in Earth’s history. Furthermore, they reveal how keeping global warming below an increase of 2°C compared with preindustrial levels could largely prevent these outcomes.  more » « less
Award ID(s):
1616821 2137701
NSF-PAR ID:
10373845
Author(s) / Creator(s):
;
Date Published:
Journal Name:
Science
Volume:
376
Issue:
6592
ISSN:
0036-8075
Page Range / eLocation ID:
452 to 453
Format(s):
Medium: X
Sponsoring Org:
National Science Foundation
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