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This content will become publicly available on September 6, 2023

Title: Reintroducing bison results in long-running and resilient increases in grassland diversity
The widespread extirpation of megafauna may have destabilized ecosystems and altered biodiversity globally. Most megafauna extinctions occurred before the modern record, leaving it unclear how their loss impacts current biodiversity. We report the long-term effects of reintroducing plains bison ( Bison bison ) in a tallgrass prairie versus two land uses that commonly occur in many North American grasslands: 1) no grazing and 2) intensive growing-season grazing by domesticated cattle ( Bos taurus ). Compared to ungrazed areas, reintroducing bison increased native plant species richness by 103% at local scales (10 m 2 ) and 86% at the catchment scale. Gains in richness continued for 29 y and were resilient to the most extreme drought in four decades. These gains are now among the largest recorded increases in species richness due to grazing in grasslands globally. Grazing by domestic cattle also increased native plant species richness, but by less than half as much as bison. This study indicates that some ecosystems maintain a latent potential for increased native plant species richness following the reintroduction of native herbivores, which was unmatched by domesticated grazers. Native-grazer gains in richness were resilient to an extreme drought, a pressure likely to become more common more » under future global environmental change. « less
Authors:
; ; ; ; ; ; ;
Award ID(s):
2025849
Publication Date:
NSF-PAR ID:
10376248
Journal Name:
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Volume:
119
Issue:
36
ISSN:
0027-8424
Sponsoring Org:
National Science Foundation
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