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This content will become publicly available on June 16, 2023

Title: Disparities in self-reported extreme weather impacts by race, ethnicity, and income in the United States
Extreme weather events are expected to increase in frequency and severity due to climate change. However, we lack an understanding of how recent extreme weather events have impacted the U.S. population. We surveyed a representative sample of the U.S. public (n = 1071) in September 2021 about self-reported impacts they experienced from six types of extreme weather events within the past three years. We find that an overwhelming majority (86%) of the U.S. public reported being at least slightly impacted by an extreme weather event, and one-third (34%) reported being either very or extremely impacted by one or more types of extreme weather events. We clustered respondents into four impact groups, representing a composite of self-reported impacts from multiple types of extreme weather events. Respondents in the highest extreme weather impact group are more than 2.5 times as likely to identify as Black or Hispanic and 1.89 times more likely to live in a household with income levels below the Federal poverty level. We also observe reports of higher extreme weather impacts from respondents who are female, do not have a bachelor’s degree and live in a rural area. Our results indicate that extreme weather impacts are being felt by more » a broad cross-section of the U.S. public, with the highest impacts being disproportionately reported by populations that have previously been found to be more vulnerable to natural disasters and other extreme events. « less
Authors:
; ;
Editors:
Giannini, Alessandra
Award ID(s):
1737565
Publication Date:
NSF-PAR ID:
10377855
Journal Name:
PLOS Climate
Volume:
1
Issue:
6
Page Range or eLocation-ID:
e0000026
ISSN:
2767-3200
Sponsoring Org:
National Science Foundation
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