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Title: Coherent momentum control of forbidden excitons
Abstract

A double-edged sword in two-dimensional material science and technology is optically forbidden dark exciton. On the one hand, it is fascinating for condensed matter physics, quantum information processing, and optoelectronics due to its long lifetime. On the other hand, it is notorious for being optically inaccessible from both excitation and detection standpoints. Here, we provide an efficient and low-loss solution to the dilemma by reintroducing photonics bound states in the continuum (BICs) to manipulate dark excitons in the momentum space. In a monolayer tungsten diselenide under normal incidence, we demonstrated a giant enhancement (~1400) for dark excitons enabled by transverse magnetic BICs with intrinsic out-of-plane electric fields. By further employing widely tunable Friedrich-Wintgen BICs, we demonstrated highly directional emission from the dark excitons with a divergence angle of merely 7°. We found that the directional emission is coherent at room temperature, unambiguously shown in polarization analyses and interference measurements. Therefore, the BICs reintroduced as a momentum-space photonic environment could be an intriguing platform to reshape and redefine light-matter interactions in nearby quantum materials, such as low-dimensional materials, otherwise challenging or even impossible to achieve.

 
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Award ID(s):
2103842
NSF-PAR ID:
10380297
Author(s) / Creator(s):
; ; ; ; ; ; ; ; ; ;
Publisher / Repository:
Nature Publishing Group
Date Published:
Journal Name:
Nature Communications
Volume:
13
Issue:
1
ISSN:
2041-1723
Format(s):
Medium: X
Sponsoring Org:
National Science Foundation
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