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Title: Effect of electrode and oxide properties on the filament kinetics during electroforming in metal-oxide-based memories
Abstract

We developed a physical model to fundamentally understand the conductive filament (CF) formation and growth behavior in the switching layer during electroforming process in the metal-oxide-based resistive random-access memories (RRAM). The effects of the electrode and oxide layer properties on the CF morphology evolution, current-voltage characteristic, local temperature, and electrical potential distribution have been systematically explored. It is found that choosing active electrodes with lower oxygen vacancy formation energy and oxides with small Lorenz number (ratio of thermal and electrical conductivity) enables CF formation at a smaller electroforming voltage and creates a CF with more homogeneous morphology. This work advances our understanding of the kinetic behaviors of the CF formation and growth during the electroforming process and could potentially guide the oxide and electrode materials selection to realize a more stable and functional RRAM.

Authors:
; ; ;
Award ID(s):
2132105
Publication Date:
NSF-PAR ID:
10381646
Journal Name:
npj Computational Materials
Volume:
8
Issue:
1
ISSN:
2057-3960
Publisher:
Nature Publishing Group
Sponsoring Org:
National Science Foundation
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