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Title: Certification and Trade-off of Multiple Fairness Criteria in Graph-based Spam Detection
Spamming reviews are prevalent in review systems to manipulate seller reputation and mislead customers. Spam detectors based on graph neural networks (GNN) exploit representation learning and graph patterns to achieve state-of-the-art detection accuracy. The detection can influence a large number of real-world entities and it is ethical to treat different groups of entities as equally as possible. However, due to skewed distributions of the graphs, GNN can fail to meet diverse fairness criteria designed for different parties. We formulate linear systems of the input features and the adjacency matrix of the review graphs for the certification of multiple fairness criteria. When the criteria are competing, we relax the certification and design a multi-objective optimization (MOO) algorithm to explore multiple efficient trade-offs, so that no objective can be improved without harming another objective. We prove that the algorithm converges to a Pareto efficient solution using duality and the implicit function theorem. Since there can be exponentially many trade-offs of the criteria, we propose a data-driven stochastic search algorithm to approximate Pareto fronts consisting of multiple efficient trade-offs. Experimentally, we show that the algorithms converge to solutions that dominate baselines based on fairness regularization and adversarial training.  more » « less
Award ID(s):
1757787
NSF-PAR ID:
10386725
Author(s) / Creator(s):
; ; ; ; ;
Date Published:
Journal Name:
Proceedings of the 30th ACM International Conference on Information & Knowledge Management
Page Range / eLocation ID:
130 to 139
Format(s):
Medium: X
Sponsoring Org:
National Science Foundation
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