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Title: Surfactant proteins and innate immunity of otitis media
Otitis media (OM) is the most common disease among young children and one of the most frequent reasons to visit the pediatrician. Development of OM requires nasopharyngeal colonization by a pathogen which must gain access to the tympanic cavity through the eustachian tube (ET) along with being able to overcome the defense mechanisms of the immune system and middle ear mucosa. OM can be caused by viral or bacterial infection. The three main bacterial pathogens are Streptococcus pneumoniae, nontypeable Haemophilus influenzae (NTHi), and Moraxella catarrhalis. Innate immunity is important in OM resolution as the disease occurs in very young children before the development of specific immunity. Elements of innate immunity include natural barriers and pattern recognition receptors such as Toll like receptors (TLRs), and Nod like receptors (NLRs). Surfactant proteins A (SP-A) and D (SP-D) act as pattern recognition receptors and are found in the lung and many other tissues including the ET and the middle ear where they probably function in host defense. Surfactant has a potential for use in the treatment of OM due to surface tension lowering function in the ET, and the possible immune functions of SP-D and SP-A in the middle ear and ET.  more » « less
Award ID(s):
1722630
NSF-PAR ID:
10388509
Author(s) / Creator(s):
; ; ;
Date Published:
Journal Name:
Innate Immunity
Volume:
28
Issue:
7-8
ISSN:
1753-4259
Page Range / eLocation ID:
213 to 223
Format(s):
Medium: X
Sponsoring Org:
National Science Foundation
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