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Title: Demographic history and gene flow in the peatmosses Sphagnum recurvum and Sphagnum flexuosum (Bryophyta: Sphagnaceae)
Authors:
; ; ;
Award ID(s):
1928514
Publication Date:
NSF-PAR ID:
10389095
Journal Name:
Ecology and Evolution
Volume:
12
Issue:
11
ISSN:
2045-7758
Sponsoring Org:
National Science Foundation
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