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Title: Tailored cluster states with high threshold under biased noise
Abstract

Fault-tolerant cluster states form the basis for scalable measurement-based quantum computation. Recently, new stabilizer codes for scalable circuit-based quantum computation have been introduced that have very high thresholds under biased noise where the qubit predominantly suffers from one type of error, e.g. dephasing. However, extending these advances in stabilizer codes to generate high-threshold cluster states for biased noise has been a challenge, as the standard method for foliating stabilizer codes to generate fault-tolerant cluster states does not preserve the noise bias. In this work, we overcome this barrier by introducing a generalization of the cluster state that allows us to foliate stabilizer codes in a bias-preserving way. As an example of our approach, we construct a foliated version of the XZZX code which we call the XZZX cluster state. We demonstrate that under a circuit-level-noise model, our XZZX cluster state has a threshold more than double the usual cluster state when dephasing errors are more likely than errors that cause bit flips by a factor of order ~100 or more.

 
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Award ID(s):
2137740
NSF-PAR ID:
10394531
Author(s) / Creator(s):
; ;
Publisher / Repository:
Nature Publishing Group
Date Published:
Journal Name:
npj Quantum Information
Volume:
9
Issue:
1
ISSN:
2056-6387
Format(s):
Medium: X
Sponsoring Org:
National Science Foundation
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